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Tasmanian poppy farmers should not depend on 'death, addiction', say Greens

The Age Wednesday, 28 August 2019
After Johnson & Johnson copped an $845 million fine, one lawyer said the US opioid crisis 'began in Tasmania' - the world's hub for legal opium poppies.
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Tasmania Tasmania Island state of Australia

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Johnson & Johnson Johnson & Johnson U.S. multinational medical devices, pharmaceutical and consumer packaged goods manufacturer

Johnson & Johnson Cease Production Of Lightening Products [Video]

Johnson & Johnson Cease Production Of Lightening Products

The corporation behind Johnson's, Neutrogena, Clean & Clear, and more has just vowed to stop selling two lines of skin-care products used for skin-lightening overseas. On June 19, in the wake of the recent Black Lives Matter uprising, Johnson & Johnson said that it will cease production of two different lines from Asian and Middle Eastern markets that were used for skin-lightening lines.

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Johnson & Johnson Speeds Up Vaccine Timeline [Video]

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Johnson & Johnson plans to start testing its coronavirus vaccine candidate in humans in July. The company said it will move up the timeline by about two months to start clinical trials. Previously the aim was to enter the clinic with the vaccine in September. The study will start in the second half of July and enroll 1,045 healthy volunteers in the US and Belgium. If the vaccine works, Johnson & Johnson has already pledged to distribute it at a nonprofit rate to help end the pandemic.

Credit: Wochit News    Duration: 00:35Published
Johnson & Johnson to Begin Human Trials for COVID-19 Vaccine [Video]

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The early-stage human trial will begin in the second half of July as opposed to its initial forecast of September.

Credit: Cover Video STUDIO    Duration: 00:56Published
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Johnson & Johnson is the world's largest health care company. Business Insider reports that the company plans to start testing its coronavirus vaccine candidate in humans in July. On Wednesday, Johnson & Johnson it will move up the timeline by about two months to start clinical trials. It was previously aiming for trials in September. 1,045 healthy volunteers in the US and Belgium will join the study, which starts in July.

Credit: Wochit News    Duration: 00:34Published

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