Australia  

Celebrating 10 Years of Trusted News Discovery
One News Page
> >

Monarch butterfly populations decline by 86 percent in a year

Video Credit: Reuters - 3D Animations (Next Me - Duration: 01:00s - Published < > Embed
Monarch butterfly populations decline by 86 percent in a year

Monarch butterfly populations decline by 86 percent in a year

Conservation groups have reported an 86 percent decline in the populations of the iconic monarch butterfly in California.

0
shares
ShareTweetSavePostSend
 

Monarch butterfly populations decline by 86 percent in a year

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact tips@nextanimation.com.tw.

Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Conservation groups have reported an 86 percent decline in the populations of the iconic monarch butterfly in California.

Data from an animal conservation group called Xerces Society revealed that counts of overwintering monarch butterflies found in California had plummeted from 148,000 in 2017 to just 20,456 in 2018.

According to research published in the Biological Conservation journal, monarch butterflies have a 72 percent risk of becoming extinct in 20 years.

Several factors contribute to the dramatic decrease in monarch butterfly populations including habitat loss, pesticide use, and climate change.

According to National Geographic, rising levels of carbon dioxide may be contaminating milkweed — a flowering plant that is the sole food source of the monarch caterpillar.

Increasing temperatures may also affect the monarch butterfly's migration route, pushing butterflies to travel further up north and affecting summer breeding areas.

Xerces Society is encouraging people to help restore the monarch butterfly population by planting nectar sources and milkweed and reducing pesticide use.

RUNDOWN SHOWS: 1.

Graphical depiction of decrease in monarch butterfly populations 2.

Representation of monarch butterfly at risk of extinction 3.

Representation of elements influencing monarch butterfly extinction 4.

Representation of pesticide damaging milkweed flowers VOICEOVER (in English): "Data from an invertebrate animal conservation group called Xerces Society revealed that counts of overwintering monarch butterflies found in California had plummeted from 148,000 in 2017 to just 20,456 in a year." "According to research published in the Biological Conservation journal, monarch butterflies have a 72 percent risk of becoming extinct in 20 years." "Several factors contribute to the dramatic decrease in monarch butterfly populations including habitat loss, pesticide use, and climate change." "According to National Geographic, rising levels of carbon dioxide may be contaminating milkweed — a flowering plant that is the sole food source of the monarch caterpillar." "Increasing temperatures may also affect the monarch butterfly's migration route, pushing butterflies to travel further up north and affecting summer breeding areas." SOURCES: Xerces Society, Biological Conservation, National Geographic https://xerces.org/2018/11/29/critically-low-monarch-population-in-california/ https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2018/12/monarch-butterflies-risk-extinction-climate-change/ https://www.westernmonarchcount.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Western-monarch-PVA_Schultz-et-al.-2017.pdf *** For story suggestions please contact tips@nextanimation.com.tw For technical and editorial support, please contact: Asia: +61 2 93 73 1841 Europe: +44 20 7542 7599 Americas and Latam: +1 800 738 8377




You Might Like

Environmentally friendly: One News Page is hosted on servers powered solely by renewable energy
© 2019 One News Page Ltd. All Rights Reserved.
About us  |  Contact us  |  Disclaimer  |  Press Room  |  Terms & Conditions  |  Content Accreditation
 RSS  |  News for my Website  |  Free news search widget  |  In the News  |  DMCA / Content Removal  |  Privacy & Data Protection Policy
How are we doing? FeedbackSend us your feedback  |   LIKE us on Facebook   FOLLOW us on Twitter  •  FOLLOW us on Pinterest
One News® is a registered trademark of One News Page Ltd.