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An OAP has become the world's oldest piper at 98

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An OAP has become the world's oldest piper at 98

An OAP has become the world's oldest piper at 98

A sprightly OAP is believed to be the oldest piper in the world - and is still blowing away at the grand old age of 98.James Beedie began playing the bagpipes age 14 after it was initially forced on him by his Scottish father and fellow bagpiper. However after many years of playing James perfected his art and, with his incredible wealth of experience, has now become an expert. The great-granddad still plays every week, offers lessons to children and even goes out on parade with the band he's been a founding member of since 1969. His last outing was on Armed Force's Day less than two weeks ago, when he donned his tartan and took to the streets of Cleethorpes, North Lincs, where he lives alone. James said: "I still enjoy playing the bagpipes to this day, after all these years."I don't drink or smoke, I just like to play the pipes. "It's nice to pass on what I have learned to the children by giving lessons on the weekend. "The bagpipes are quite a sociable instrument, when people hear me playing out and about they often stop for a chat, which I enjoy. "After so long I'd like to think I'm quite good now, but someone else might disagree, you never know."I'm glad I've kept on playing. "Everyone has an achievement and the bagpipes are mine."He added: "My dad had a firm hand and made sure that I followed in his footsteps by playing the pipes. "I still remember the first song I ever learned, it was Cock O the North, I remember it well."James was born in 1921 to a Scottish father and a Belgian mother, who met each other during the First World War. Despite growing up and living all his life in North Lincolnshire James' dad, who shared the same name, always told his boy "you're a Scot laddy". He also gave his son no choice other than to take up the bagpipes at the earliest opportunity.  James describes his father as a "hard" man, who would ensure the bagpipes were practised on a daily basis. When he was still a teenager in 1939 the Second World War started and James joined the Home Guard, which he served with in Aberdeenshire in the 1940s. After the war he returned to England and began working in Grimsby harbour filleting fresh fish, a job that he did until he retired aged 65. In the 1940s he married wife Jessie, who died some years ago, and had a daughter called Ann with her. He now has more than a dozen grandchildren and great-grandchildren. In 1969 James and a group of friends founded a band that's now known as the Grimsby and District Pipe Band.Three years ago James feared he had played his final song after falling from a ladder and breaking three ribs and puncturing a lung. However, within just three months he was back on parade. Some of Jim's favourite songs to play on the bagpipes are Amazing Grace, Scotland The Brave, Rowan Tree and Piobairoachd. James' good friend, John Best, said: "James taught me to play the bagpipes many years ago. "I couldn't have asked for a better teacher, he's an absolutely brilliant player. "There are very few people out there with an ear as good as his."It's fantastic that he's still playing to this day.

There's no stopping him."

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An OAP has become the world's oldest piper at 98

A sprightly OAP is believed to be the oldest piper in the world - and is still blowing away at the grand old age of 98.James Beedie began playing the bagpipes age 14 after it was initially forced on him by his Scottish father and fellow bagpiper. However after many years of playing James perfected his art and, with his incredible wealth of experience, has now become an expert. The great-granddad still plays every week, offers lessons to children and even goes out on parade with the band he's been a founding member of since 1969. His last outing was on Armed Force's Day less than two weeks ago, when he donned his tartan and took to the streets of Cleethorpes, North Lincs, where he lives alone. James said: "I still enjoy playing the bagpipes to this day, after all these years."I don't drink or smoke, I just like to play the pipes. "It's nice to pass on what I have learned to the children by giving lessons on the weekend. "The bagpipes are quite a sociable instrument, when people hear me playing out and about they often stop for a chat, which I enjoy. "After so long I'd like to think I'm quite good now, but someone else might disagree, you never know."I'm glad I've kept on playing. "Everyone has an achievement and the bagpipes are mine."He added: "My dad had a firm hand and made sure that I followed in his footsteps by playing the pipes. "I still remember the first song I ever learned, it was Cock O the North, I remember it well."James was born in 1921 to a Scottish father and a Belgian mother, who met each other during the First World War. Despite growing up and living all his life in North Lincolnshire James' dad, who shared the same name, always told his boy "you're a Scot laddy". He also gave his son no choice other than to take up the bagpipes at the earliest opportunity.  James describes his father as a "hard" man, who would ensure the bagpipes were practised on a daily basis. When he was still a teenager in 1939 the Second World War started and James joined the Home Guard, which he served with in Aberdeenshire in the 1940s. After the war he returned to England and began working in Grimsby harbour filleting fresh fish, a job that he did until he retired aged 65. In the 1940s he married wife Jessie, who died some years ago, and had a daughter called Ann with her. He now has more than a dozen grandchildren and great-grandchildren. In 1969 James and a group of friends founded a band that's now known as the Grimsby and District Pipe Band.Three years ago James feared he had played his final song after falling from a ladder and breaking three ribs and puncturing a lung. However, within just three months he was back on parade. Some of Jim's favourite songs to play on the bagpipes are Amazing Grace, Scotland The Brave, Rowan Tree and Piobairoachd. James' good friend, John Best, said: "James taught me to play the bagpipes many years ago. "I couldn't have asked for a better teacher, he's an absolutely brilliant player. "There are very few people out there with an ear as good as his."It's fantastic that he's still playing to this day.

There's no stopping him."




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