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Tuesday, 19 January 2021

Woman wakes up to hundreds of hummingbirds on her front porch

Credit: SWNS STUDIO
Duration: 02:16s 0 shares 1 views
Woman wakes up to hundreds of hummingbirds on her front porch
Woman wakes up to hundreds of hummingbirds on her front porch

A woman woke one morning to find hundreds of multicoloured HUMMINGBIRDS drinking nectar on her front porch.

Christy McCloy, 52, heard a "general hubbub" coming outside, and decided to inspect the sound, taking her camera with her.

The bird enthusiast was astonished to find nearly 300 hummingbirds flying round the front of her house, drinking the nectar she made.

Retired teacher Christy photographed ruby-throated, buff-bellied, black-chinned, and even rufous hummingbirds from 7am until 7pm on October 1.

She even had to make three extra gallons of nectar - made from water and sugar - to keep the charm of hummingbirds happy and fed.

Christy, of Corpus Christi in Texas, USA, said her little home is visited every spring and autumn by hummingbirds migrating to and from Canada and Mexico.

But she's never seen so many hummingbirds all on her porch, she claimed.

Christy said: "I always get large numbers of hummingbirds during spring and fall migration, but [that morning] there were even greater numbers!

"So I stepped out front to hear them better, and decided to grab my phone to video.

"That day turned out to be the peak day for numbers at my house!

I was lucky!

"I even had to make over three gallons of nectar to keep the feeders full!

"A gentleman from a birding site in southern Texas estimated there were at least 200, and possibly as many as 300 birds!

"The charm was thick like that for 12 hours, from 7 in the morning until sunset!" Hummingbirds, native to the Americas, are the smallest of birds, most species measuring just 7.5-13 cm in length.

They eat a variety of insects including mosquitoes and fruit flies, and drink nectar to supply their energy needs.

Most North American hummingbirds southwards in autumn to spend winter in Mexico, the Caribbean Islands, or Central America.

Christy said south Texas is "very popular with birders because we get such a wide variety of birds, not just hummingbirds, during migration".

She said that she's even had "large numbers of Orioles" flying by too.

But Christy was "taken aback by the sheer number of them all at my house" - adding: "Had I known about them in advance, I'd have picked up my good camera instead!"

A woman woke one morning to find hundreds of multicoloured HUMMINGBIRDS drinking nectar on her front porch.

Christy McCloy, 52, heard a "general hubbub" coming outside, and decided to inspect the sound, taking her camera with her.

The bird enthusiast was astonished to find nearly 300 hummingbirds flying round the front of her house, drinking the nectar she made.

Retired teacher Christy photographed ruby-throated, buff-bellied, black-chinned, and even rufous hummingbirds from 7am until 7pm on October 1.

She even had to make three extra gallons of nectar - made from water and sugar - to keep the charm of hummingbirds happy and fed.

Christy, of Corpus Christi in Texas, USA, said her little home is visited every spring and autumn by hummingbirds migrating to and from Canada and Mexico.

But she's never seen so many hummingbirds all on her porch, she claimed.

Christy said: "I always get large numbers of hummingbirds during spring and fall migration, but [that morning] there were even greater numbers!

"So I stepped out front to hear them better, and decided to grab my phone to video.

"That day turned out to be the peak day for numbers at my house!

I was lucky!

"I even had to make over three gallons of nectar to keep the feeders full!

"A gentleman from a birding site in southern Texas estimated there were at least 200, and possibly as many as 300 birds!

"The charm was thick like that for 12 hours, from 7 in the morning until sunset!" Hummingbirds, native to the Americas, are the smallest of birds, most species measuring just 7.5-13 cm in length.

They eat a variety of insects including mosquitoes and fruit flies, and drink nectar to supply their energy needs.

Most North American hummingbirds southwards in autumn to spend winter in Mexico, the Caribbean Islands, or Central America.

Christy said south Texas is "very popular with birders because we get such a wide variety of birds, not just hummingbirds, during migration".

She said that she's even had "large numbers of Orioles" flying by too.

But Christy was "taken aback by the sheer number of them all at my house" - adding: "Had I known about them in advance, I'd have picked up my good camera instead!"

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