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A convicted felon who went viral for singing an 'Adele' parody apology song to his victim in COURT is fresh out of prison with a

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A convicted felon who went viral for singing an 'Adele' parody apology song to his victim in COURT is fresh out of prison with a

A convicted felon who went viral for singing an 'Adele' parody apology song to his victim in COURT is fresh out of prison with a

A convicted felon who went viral for singing an Adele-inspired apology song to his victim in COURT is fresh out of prison with a new redemption ballad. Brian Earl Taylor became an internet sensation in March 2016 for singing his regrets to a courtroom in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA - as he was convicted of illegally carrying a concealed weapon and unlawful imprisonment. As Brian, then 21, was sentenced to three years, six months for his crimes he sang the remorseful tune, inspired by Adele's track Hello."I want to say I'm sorry for the things I've done, and I try to be stronger in this life I've chosen," Brian crooned to the judge Darlene O'Brien and the victim's family. "But I want you to know, that door I closed, your honor.

I'm sorry, sorry, sorry," he continued to the stunned courtroom. Now Brian, 25, from Ypsilanti, Michigan, has served his time and wants to show the world he's a reformed man with a new version of the British superstar's 2015 comeback track. In his latest tune Brian belts out some repentant lyrics, which he wrote while behind bars. He sings: "Hello world, it's me, I was wondering if after all these years we could meet to go over a couple of things.  "They said that time was going to help me and it turns out that it did.  "Hello, can you all hear me?

I'm inside these four walls dreaming about who I used to be when I was younger and free." "I've forgotten how it felt before my world came crumbling, there's such a difference in me now from a couple of years ago.  "Hey hello, now I'm outside, I must have spent a thousand nights trying to tell the world I'm sorry."  Brian was released from the Woodland Correctional Facility in Michigan last month [Sept 10, 2019].  He has since moved in with his sister in Ypsilanti, Michigan and got himself two jobs - one in construction and one as a cleaner for commercial buildings. While locked up he taught himself how to play the keyboard and read everything he could to prepare himself for a new life without crime.He said: "The day I left prison, I can't even explain the feeling with words, it was a real high off life, my whole body felt free, it was like I could breathe again. "I enjoyed myself with my family for the first couple of days then I went straight out to look for a job, I was like, 'it's grind time now.'  "My time in prison was full of misery, but I pushed through it, I was one of the lucky ones because I always knew that I had something to come home to. "I have a family and a support network, I grew up in the suburbs so I knew if I could just get through my time then I could rebuild my life again afterwards.  "I am done with crime forever now, I'm like those kids in that TV show Beyond Scared Straight.

I have tapped out of crime forever, it's not worth it, not at all. "In prison I taught myself the keyboard and read books about business management and I read a lot of self improvement books too…so that I wouldn't go back to crime. "I tried to spend every minute I could being productive while I was in there.  "I never gambled or got into fights, I wanted to use the time to improve myself."  While locked up Brian volunteered for the Prisoner Palliative Care Aid program (PPCA) to help sick inmates during their final days He said: "I saw people die and it had a deep effect on me.

I wrote a song about that too." He also volunteered for Prisoner Observation Aid (POA) and was entrusted with watching other prisoners to ensure they didn't hurt themselves, or attempt suicide. He said: "That had a deep effect on me too.

There are a lot of mentally ill people in there and I wanted to help. "During peer-to-peer group therapy, I sang songs to people to lift their spirits and I feel like they related to that.  "Now I'm out, people don't even think that I've been to prison because of how I conduct myself, I'm polite and I try to treat everyone how I want to be treated.  "I tried to learn respect and boundaries while I was in there.

I didn't want to come out worse, I wanted to come out better. "I missed so much time with my family, I am so happy to finally be there for the people that I love, I want to be a good role model for my younger brother now."  Adele, 31, released "Hello" in 2015 after a three-year hiatus from the spotlight. Brain said: "My first song went viral while I was locked up.

I missed my time in the spotlight because of my crimes, I was just glad that people got to see how sorry I was." Brian is planning to release an album in March of 2020. 

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A convicted felon who went viral for singing an Adele-inspired apology song to his victim in COURT is fresh out of prison with a new redemption ballad.

Brian Earl Taylor became an internet sensation in March 2016 for singing his regrets to a courtroom in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA - as he was convicted of illegally carrying a concealed weapon and unlawful imprisonment.

As Brian, then 21, was sentenced to three years, six months for his crimes he sang the remorseful tune, inspired by Adele's track Hello."I want to say I'm sorry for the things I've done, and I try to be stronger in this life I've chosen," Brian crooned to the judge Darlene O'Brien and the victim's family.

"But I want you to know, that door I closed, your honor.

I'm sorry, sorry, sorry," he continued to the stunned courtroom.

Now Brian, 25, from Ypsilanti, Michigan, has served his time and wants to show the world he's a reformed man with a new version of the British superstar's 2015 comeback track.

In his latest tune Brian belts out some repentant lyrics, which he wrote while behind bars.

He sings: "Hello world, it's me, I was wondering if after all these years we could meet to go over a couple of things.

"They said that time was going to help me and it turns out that it did.

"Hello, can you all hear me?

I'm inside these four walls dreaming about who I used to be when I was younger and free." "I've forgotten how it felt before my world came crumbling, there's such a difference in me now from a couple of years ago.

"Hey hello, now I'm outside, I must have spent a thousand nights trying to tell the world I'm sorry."  Brian was released from the Woodland Correctional Facility in Michigan last month [Sept 10, 2019].

He has since moved in with his sister in Ypsilanti, Michigan and got himself two jobs - one in construction and one as a cleaner for commercial buildings.

While locked up he taught himself how to play the keyboard and read everything he could to prepare himself for a new life without crime.He said: "The day I left prison, I can't even explain the feeling with words, it was a real high off life, my whole body felt free, it was like I could breathe again.

"I enjoyed myself with my family for the first couple of days then I went straight out to look for a job, I was like, 'it's grind time now.'

"My time in prison was full of misery, but I pushed through it, I was one of the lucky ones because I always knew that I had something to come home to.

"I have a family and a support network, I grew up in the suburbs so I knew if I could just get through my time then I could rebuild my life again afterwards.

"I am done with crime forever now, I'm like those kids in that TV show Beyond Scared Straight.

I have tapped out of crime forever, it's not worth it, not at all.

"In prison I taught myself the keyboard and read books about business management and I read a lot of self improvement books too…so that I wouldn't go back to crime.

"I tried to spend every minute I could being productive while I was in there.

"I never gambled or got into fights, I wanted to use the time to improve myself."  While locked up Brian volunteered for the Prisoner Palliative Care Aid program (PPCA) to help sick inmates during their final days He said: "I saw people die and it had a deep effect on me.

I wrote a song about that too." He also volunteered for Prisoner Observation Aid (POA) and was entrusted with watching other prisoners to ensure they didn't hurt themselves, or attempt suicide.

He said: "That had a deep effect on me too.

There are a lot of mentally ill people in there and I wanted to help.

"During peer-to-peer group therapy, I sang songs to people to lift their spirits and I feel like they related to that.

"Now I'm out, people don't even think that I've been to prison because of how I conduct myself, I'm polite and I try to treat everyone how I want to be treated.

"I tried to learn respect and boundaries while I was in there.

I didn't want to come out worse, I wanted to come out better.

"I missed so much time with my family, I am so happy to finally be there for the people that I love, I want to be a good role model for my younger brother now."  Adele, 31, released "Hello" in 2015 after a three-year hiatus from the spotlight.

Brain said: "My first song went viral while I was locked up.

I missed my time in the spotlight because of my crimes, I was just glad that people got to see how sorry I was." Brian is planning to release an album in March of 2020.




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