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More than 60% of minority women say the skin care industry that doesn’t have enough options for them

Video Credit: SWNS STUDIO - Duration: 00:46s - Published < > Embed
More than 60% of minority women say the skin care industry that doesn’t have enough options for them

More than 60% of minority women say the skin care industry that doesn’t have enough options for them

The average woman will spend $20,466.72 on skincare in her adult lifetime, according to new research.

Within the span of a month a woman will spend $27.96 on skincare — or $335.52 every year.

A study of 1,000 general population women and 1,000 women of color explored the seemingly never-ending journey for the perfect skincare routine.

In spite of spending a small fortune in a year, one in four women wouldn't call their current skincare products "effective." The survey conducted by OnePoll on behalf of LeCerre Skincare revealed lack of effectiveness isn't even a good enough reason to go in search of new products.

Results showed half of respondents (53%) think their skincare is ineffective, but are afraid to try something new because it could negatively affect their skin.

Women of color are 7% more likely to stick with their current routine out of fear for what a different product could do to their skin.

It takes a great deal of time and patience to find a product that's even a worthy addition to her skincare routine.

The average woman goes through three products before finding one effective enough to join the lineup.

It's not a decision women take lightly either since the average woman will try a product for seven days before giving up on it due to lack of effectiveness or skin reactions.

Skincare products that don't work can wreak havoc on our skin, with the average respondent saying they've had three bad skin reactions while experimenting with new products.

It's no wonder then so many women feel frustrated by the lack of offerings from the skincare industry.

Fifty-nine percent feel ignored and there aren't enough effective products for them.

That percentage jumps to 63% among women of color when asked the same.

An area of serious concern for respondents was skincare specific to skin tone.

Two thirds of respondents overall feel underserved because there are no skincare products for their specific skin tone.

Nearly seven in ten (69%) women of color expressed the same irritation.

A spokesperson for LeCerre Skincare said, "Beauty standards have historically been Eurocentric (focus on Caucasian features, colors, and culture) and as a result, beauty and skincare products have predominantly carried forward these standards such as popularizing skin whitening among those with ethnic skin.

The formulations of these products frankly do not incorporate the latest research in skin diversity which are now conducted in major universities around the world, especially in Japan, Singapore, China, Thailand, South Korea, and India.

This new research presents data that suggests different skin tones and skin types require different approaches to skin care." Respondents noted areas for improvement and what they'd like to see more of when it comes to their skincare products.

One in two wished for more clinical research for products for women of color and wider ranging products for all skin tones (43%).

Two in five think there ought to be more budget-friendly products and 17% think there should be less emphasis on trendy treatments.

Forty-three percent dream of more effective products for those niche skin issues.

At the top of the wish list of skin troubles respondents want better products for were eczema (39%), seborrheic dermatitis (33%) and acne (26%).

The spokesperson for LeCerre Skincare added, "Clinical research has shown that pigment disorders affect women of color more frequently, especially as they age.

Conditions such as dark marks, brown spots, melasma and hyperpigmentation are tricky to treat and often times have a high chance for relapse after treatment with lasers or acid peels while running the risk for post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH).

Overall, women of color need to be cautious as PIH may cause further skin discoloration leaving them worse off than before.

The truth is when it comes to the skin, there is no magic bullet.

The skin is the largest organ in the body that requires time to heal and regenerate.

Effective skincare are the ones replenish the skin's chemical composition so it can do its job well."

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More than 60% of minority women say the skin care industry that doesn’t have enough options for them

The average woman will spend $20,466.72 on skincare in her adult lifetime, according to new research.

Within the span of a month a woman will spend $27.96 on skincare — or $335.52 every year.

A study of 1,000 general population women and 1,000 women of color explored the seemingly never-ending journey for the perfect skincare routine.

In spite of spending a small fortune in a year, one in four women wouldn't call their current skincare products "effective." The survey conducted by OnePoll on behalf of LeCerre Skincare revealed lack of effectiveness isn't even a good enough reason to go in search of new products.

Results showed half of respondents (53%) think their skincare is ineffective, but are afraid to try something new because it could negatively affect their skin.

Women of color are 7% more likely to stick with their current routine out of fear for what a different product could do to their skin.

It takes a great deal of time and patience to find a product that's even a worthy addition to her skincare routine.

The average woman goes through three products before finding one effective enough to join the lineup.

It's not a decision women take lightly either since the average woman will try a product for seven days before giving up on it due to lack of effectiveness or skin reactions.

Skincare products that don't work can wreak havoc on our skin, with the average respondent saying they've had three bad skin reactions while experimenting with new products.

It's no wonder then so many women feel frustrated by the lack of offerings from the skincare industry.

Fifty-nine percent feel ignored and there aren't enough effective products for them.

That percentage jumps to 63% among women of color when asked the same.

An area of serious concern for respondents was skincare specific to skin tone.

Two thirds of respondents overall feel underserved because there are no skincare products for their specific skin tone.

Nearly seven in ten (69%) women of color expressed the same irritation.

A spokesperson for LeCerre Skincare said, "Beauty standards have historically been Eurocentric (focus on Caucasian features, colors, and culture) and as a result, beauty and skincare products have predominantly carried forward these standards such as popularizing skin whitening among those with ethnic skin.

The formulations of these products frankly do not incorporate the latest research in skin diversity which are now conducted in major universities around the world, especially in Japan, Singapore, China, Thailand, South Korea, and India.

This new research presents data that suggests different skin tones and skin types require different approaches to skin care." Respondents noted areas for improvement and what they'd like to see more of when it comes to their skincare products.

One in two wished for more clinical research for products for women of color and wider ranging products for all skin tones (43%).

Two in five think there ought to be more budget-friendly products and 17% think there should be less emphasis on trendy treatments.

Forty-three percent dream of more effective products for those niche skin issues.

At the top of the wish list of skin troubles respondents want better products for were eczema (39%), seborrheic dermatitis (33%) and acne (26%).

The spokesperson for LeCerre Skincare added, "Clinical research has shown that pigment disorders affect women of color more frequently, especially as they age.

Conditions such as dark marks, brown spots, melasma and hyperpigmentation are tricky to treat and often times have a high chance for relapse after treatment with lasers or acid peels while running the risk for post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH).

Overall, women of color need to be cautious as PIH may cause further skin discoloration leaving them worse off than before.

The truth is when it comes to the skin, there is no magic bullet.

The skin is the largest organ in the body that requires time to heal and regenerate.

Effective skincare are the ones replenish the skin's chemical composition so it can do its job well."




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