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14y.o earns his second place in the record books (RAW)

Video Credit: SWNS STUDIO - Duration: 01:16s - Published
14y.o earns his second place in the record books (RAW)

14y.o earns his second place in the record books (RAW)

A 14-year-old boy has earned a SECOND place in the record books by using his brilliant memory - in a timed trial identifying books by their lead characters.

Monty Lord scooped the amazing accolade by naming ten novels by their protagonists in just 11.5 seconds - just under one book every second.

The teenager wanted to have another go at another title after his last record saw him reel off 129 book titles - recognising them by their first line alone.

Monty had arranged his latest record attempt with Guinness World Record who stipulated he had two weeks to memorise 150 book titles and their main characters.

He wasn't allowed to include any books that gave the character's name as the title.

They then whittled that list down to 106 books three days before his challenge.

On Thursday February 13, Monty went into his school, St Joseph's RC High School & Sports College, in Bolton, Lancs., where he attempted his record under strict conditions.

Amazing footage taken at the event shows the schoolboy keeping his cool as he reels off the book titles in super-quick time, smashing the time he had to beat set by the famous record-breakers.

He is the first to achieve this record.

Monty stumbled a little on one character, but dad, Fabian Lord, 44, explained that it was because the examiner pronounced the name of the lead character from Moby Dick, Captain Ahab, differently to how he had learned it.

The TV producer said: "He was brilliant under such tense conditions.

I know him so well so I could see how nervous he was, but he thrived in the end.

"I am incredibly proud." Monty received his certificate for his achievement on Monday.

Monty said: "I am so pleased to have this, it's brilliant.

I'm now thinking I might try another and go for a hat-trick." The keen reader, from Bolton, likes choosing topics to do with books to encourage the written word.

He became fascinated by the subject of memory when he completed a module in the subject while doing a long-distance course in psychology.

So when his dad threw down the gauntlet to get into the record books, Monty accepted the challenge.

The ambitious teen uses visual techniques to connect the characters to their titles.

He has created his own recall methods that have proven so successful during his record-breaking that he already has two schools invite him in to train their students.

His latest record is already listed on the Guinness World Records website.

Monty's headteacher, Mr Tony McCabe, said: "At St.

Joseph's high school in recent months we've had a real push to encourage our young people to believe that they can achieve anything that they put their minds to and Monty has done just that.

"We're so proud to have a Guinness World Record holder here at St.

Joseph's and it's an amazing achievement and a real testimony to Monty's literature knowledge.

"We're delighted that it flags up the importance of literature and Monty is a true inspiration to others who wish to achieve ambitious goals." Amazingly, Monty didn't initially set out to break world records.

His journey began when he undertook a research study in his own time, looking at the affects of electronic devices on circadian rhythms - the sleep-wake cycle.

To further his knowledge Monty applied for financial aid to complete a long-distance psychology course at Yale University in America - all without his dad knowing.

Monty has passed his course with 100% in his assignment grades.

The course had a module on memory and this is what got Monty hooked.

Guinness World Records Editor-in-Chief Craig Glenday said: "Monty is a great advocate for reading, so we're thrilled to be able to recognise his second book-related Guinness World Records title.

"As a publisher, it's particularly important to us that we celebrate both the printed word and the people who get so much joy from reading.

"Congratulations, Monty - you're Officially Amazing.

I'll make sure you can read about yourself in the next edition of our book."

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A 14-year-old boy has earned a SECOND place in the record books by using his brilliant memory - in a timed trial identifying books by their lead characters.

Monty Lord scooped the amazing accolade by naming ten novels by their protagonists in just 11.5 seconds - just under one book every second.

The teenager wanted to have another go at another title after his last record saw him reel off 129 book titles - recognising them by their first line alone.

Monty had arranged his latest record attempt with Guinness World Record who stipulated he had two weeks to memorise 150 book titles and their main characters.

He wasn't allowed to include any books that gave the character's name as the title.

They then whittled that list down to 106 books three days before his challenge.

On Thursday February 13, Monty went into his school, St Joseph's RC High School & Sports College, in Bolton, Lancs., where he attempted his record under strict conditions.

Amazing footage taken at the event shows the schoolboy keeping his cool as he reels off the book titles in super-quick time, smashing the time he had to beat set by the famous record-breakers.

He is the first to achieve this record.

Monty stumbled a little on one character, but dad, Fabian Lord, 44, explained that it was because the examiner pronounced the name of the lead character from Moby Dick, Captain Ahab, differently to how he had learned it.

The TV producer said: "He was brilliant under such tense conditions.

I know him so well so I could see how nervous he was, but he thrived in the end.

"I am incredibly proud." Monty received his certificate for his achievement on Monday.

Monty said: "I am so pleased to have this, it's brilliant.

I'm now thinking I might try another and go for a hat-trick." The keen reader, from Bolton, likes choosing topics to do with books to encourage the written word.

He became fascinated by the subject of memory when he completed a module in the subject while doing a long-distance course in psychology.

So when his dad threw down the gauntlet to get into the record books, Monty accepted the challenge.

The ambitious teen uses visual techniques to connect the characters to their titles.

He has created his own recall methods that have proven so successful during his record-breaking that he already has two schools invite him in to train their students.

His latest record is already listed on the Guinness World Records website.

Monty's headteacher, Mr Tony McCabe, said: "At St.

Joseph's high school in recent months we've had a real push to encourage our young people to believe that they can achieve anything that they put their minds to and Monty has done just that.

"We're so proud to have a Guinness World Record holder here at St.

Joseph's and it's an amazing achievement and a real testimony to Monty's literature knowledge.

"We're delighted that it flags up the importance of literature and Monty is a true inspiration to others who wish to achieve ambitious goals." Amazingly, Monty didn't initially set out to break world records.

His journey began when he undertook a research study in his own time, looking at the affects of electronic devices on circadian rhythms - the sleep-wake cycle.

To further his knowledge Monty applied for financial aid to complete a long-distance psychology course at Yale University in America - all without his dad knowing.

Monty has passed his course with 100% in his assignment grades.

The course had a module on memory and this is what got Monty hooked.

Guinness World Records Editor-in-Chief Craig Glenday said: "Monty is a great advocate for reading, so we're thrilled to be able to recognise his second book-related Guinness World Records title.

"As a publisher, it's particularly important to us that we celebrate both the printed word and the people who get so much joy from reading.

"Congratulations, Monty - you're Officially Amazing.

I'll make sure you can read about yourself in the next edition of our book."




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