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New Study Offers Hope For Adult Dyslexics

Video Credit: Wochit News - Duration: 00:39s - Published
New Study Offers Hope For Adult Dyslexics

New Study Offers Hope For Adult Dyslexics

Researchers from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, have made a surprising, even shocking, breakthrough in treating adult dyslexics.

Dyslexia is commonly known as a reading disorder.

Affecting up to 10% of the population, it entails lifelong problems with written material.

According to UPI, the researchers say in a new study that electrical stimulation of the brain improves reading accuracy in dyslexic adults.


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University of Geneva University of Geneva Public university in Geneva, Switzerland


Switzerland Switzerland Federal republic in Central Europe

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