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Tuesday, 15 June 2021

Local expert explains the signs of autism parents should look for

Credit: WLFI
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Local expert explains the signs of autism parents should look for
Local expert explains the signs of autism parents should look for

A Purdue professor explains what parents should look for and what they should do if they suspect their child has Autism.

On autism awareness.

Tonight, a purdue professor explains what parents should look for and what they should do if they suspect their child has autism.

Rispoli "it is increasing and we know that we have services and support for families."

Autism spectrum disorder affects 1 in 54 children in the u-s.

That's according to the cdc.

Purdue autism research center co- director mandy rispoli says parents should be on the look out for the signs of the disorder.

Rispoli "when families are not seeing their 12-month- old hit some of those milestones, they probably want to reach out to get support from their pediatrician."

Those milestones include using simple gestures like waving or pointing.

Children should be using baby talk and saying simple words like, "mama or dada".

Rispoli "especially if they used to have some skills and you're not seeing them use those skills anymore.

That's a sign that maybe it's time to reach out and get some additional support."

Rispoli says pediatricians should do autism screenings at 18 and 24 months.

However, it never hurts to share concerns with a doctor.

Rispoli "if the family is seeing other concerns during that time or in between those appointments, it's important to reach out."

Rispoli says getting a diagnosis as early as possible is crucial for children.

Rispoli "the earlier we can intervene and offer support to children and to families, the better the outcomes."

Rispoli says parents play a key role in making sure their child gets the help they need.

Rispoli "what's important to know is that child you bring into the doctor's office is the same child you're bringing home.

So, nothing is changing.

It's still your baby.

It's still your daughter or your son, and you still love or care for them just as you did before these labels were assigned."

We have a link with resources and more signs for parents to look for on our website, wlfi dot com.

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