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Tuesday, 27 July 2021

Muslims in Myanmar's Yangon celebrate Eid against coup backdrop

Duration: 04:08s 0 shares 3 views
Muslims in Myanmar's Yangon celebrate Eid against coup backdrop
Muslims in Myanmar's Yangon celebrate Eid against coup backdrop

Muslims across the world celebrated Eid al-Fitr with masks and prayers, as conflicts and coronavirus restrictions cast shadows over the festival's mass gatherings and family reunions.

Muslims across the world celebrated Eid al-Fitr with masks and prayers, as conflicts and coronavirus restrictions cast shadows over the festival's mass gatherings and family reunions.

Many COVID-hit countries, including Pakistan, India, Malaysia and Indonesia imposed curbs, shut shops and even some mosques - though the numbers out praying were higher than in 2020 when lockdowns all but cancelled events.

Some in Yangon expressed security concerns as they came to pray.

Video filmed on May 13 shows Muslims performing prayers for Eid al Fitr in Yangon while following all the COVID-19 restrictions.

There is a debate in the community about whether to celebrate on Thursday or Friday.

The main Islamic organization said the moon was not seen last night, while Muslims in the southern part of the country said it was.

After all, the majority of the population will celebrate Eid on Friday.

U Phoe Hlaing, 73, said: "In all my 73 years, this year was the worst.

Covid-19 and the current political situation have completely deteriorated my entire life.

That's why I'm here in the Masjid, even if less than half the crowd is present, and there is not enough room for prayers.

We don't have any happiness.

I just come here once a day to pray.

I didn't even bring my mobile phone with me because the security forces can check it, I don't know when they would have arrived at my place.

So there is no happiness, we can't see our relatives, we can't do anything.

We can't even go to the cemetery to pay our respects to our deceased relative.

Therefore, we come here to pray, and then we will return home with sadness on this day of Eid al Fitr." Ma May Oo Thitsar said: "Even I found myself thinking last night about the possibility of a bomb going off in the Masjid.

What if the security forces had come there and stopped us from praying?

What would happen then?"