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Thursday, 5 August 2021

Texas governor signs 'fetal heartbeat' abortion ban

Duration: 01:45s 1 shares 3 views
Texas governor signs 'fetal heartbeat' abortion ban
Texas governor signs 'fetal heartbeat' abortion ban

[NFA] Republican Texas Governor Greg Abbott on Wednesday signed into law a "fetal heartbeat" abortion bill that bans the procedure after about six weeks of pregnancy and grants citizens the right to sue doctors who perform abortions past that point.

This report produced by Yahaira Jacquez.

Abbott: "Now, we're about to make it law." Republican Texas Governor Greg Abbott on Wednesday signed into law a so called "fetal heartbeat" abortion bill that bans the procedure after about six weeks of pregnancy - sometimes before many women even know they're pregnant.

It's part of a wave of similar abortion measures passed in Republican-led states - that bans the procedure once a fetal heartbeat is detected.

The lawmakers who support such legislation have said it's intended to overturn Roe v.

Wade, the U.S. Supreme Court's 1973 landmark ruling that guaranteed a woman's right to end her pregnancy.

Just this week - the high court opened the door for such an overturn of Roe v.

Wade - or at least a narrowing - by agreeing to review Mississippi's bid to ban abortions after 15 weeks.

Abbott - "Our creator endowed us with the right to life, and yet millions of children lose their right to life every year because of abortion.

In Texas we work to save those lives." The Texas law, which would take effect in September if it is not stopped by a court, allows citizens to bring a civil lawsuit against doctors or anyone who helps a woman get an abortion once a heartbeat is detected.

In an open letter earlier this month, some 200 Texas physicians said they were worried the law would expose doctors to the risk of "frivolous lawsuits that threaten our ability to provide healthcare." Adding: "As licensed physicians in Texas, we implore you to not weaponize the judicial branch against us to make a political point."

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